Renegar to Reject Board of Commercial Pet Breeders Rules

Anticipates filing legislation to address excessive regulations

The newly created Board of Commercial Pet Breeders recently adopted rules that have outraged many breeders in Oklahoma, including one state representative who is also a veterinarian and originally supported passage of the legislation that created the Board. State Representative Brian Renegar , DVM, anticipates filing legislation this coming session to block the rules as presently promulgated by the Board of Commercial Pet Breeders. The McAlester Democrat has concerns about the over-reaching effect and negative implications these new rules will have on all pet breeders across the state. “When we discussed the Commercial Pet Breeders Act this past session, we were promised that any rules adopted by the Board would not be more stringent than those implemented by the U.S. Department of Agriculture,” said Rep. Renegar. “Instead, the Board has created such strict rules that I doubt hardly any pet breeder would be able to meet these new standards!” Rep. Renegar noted that the intent of the Commercial Pet Breeders Act was to address the mass breeding operations in which animals were raised in deplorable conditions. He supported requiring that these establishments provide their animals with basic necessities such as adequate cleanliness, shelter, food and fresh water. However, he states that the new rules adopted by the Board are severe and, if applied to other realms such as animal hospitals, very few could even come into compliance. One example he points to is the rule that states that the stacking of dog enclosures is prohibited. He argues that if a barrier is between the enclosures and it prevents leakage of any waste or other substance from passing through, and the enclosures can be cleaned and sanitized, then they should be allowed. Another example of excessive regulations Rep. Renegar noted is the requirement that commercial pet breeders employ one full-time staff person for each 25 adult pets located at a facility. “I have a client who has around 50 dogs, and he does an adequate job himself of cleaning his facility twice a day. Requiring him to hire another person to assist him is economically burdensome and unnecessary.” “I also have grave concerns about the rule that requires ‘adequate rest between breeding cycles’. I am a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience, and I don’t think highly of a Board or government bureaucracy that tries to tell a producer how many times and when they can breed an animal. I think this is a very dangerous precedent to set.” “The rules that are currently in place penalize our good breeders, and if left unchecked will force them out of business. I don’t believe this was the intent of the Commercial Pet Breeders Act, but the Board has adopted rules that are excessive, and they cannot stand. If a large portion of these rules are not modified or removed entirely, I will lead the fight to have the Legislature disapprove these rules, which unfortunately would discard the good regulations as well.”



Renegar to Reject Board of Commercial Pet Breeders Rules

Anticipates filing legislation to address excessive regulations

 OKLAHOMA C IT Y (November 22, 2010) The newly created Board of Commercial Pet Breeders recently adopted rules that have outraged many breeders in Oklahoma, including one state representative who is also a veterinarian and originally supported passage of the legislation that created the Board. State Representative Brian Renegar , DVM, anticipates filing legislation this coming session to block the rules as presently promulgated by the Board of Commercial Pet Breeders. The McAlester Democrat has concerns about the over-reaching effect and negative implications these new rules will have on all pet breeders across the state.  

 “When we discussed the Commercial Pet Breeders Act this past session, we were promised that any rules adopted by the Board would not be more stringent than those implemented by the U.S. Department of Agriculture,” said Rep. Renegar. “Instead, the Board has created such strict rules that I doubt hardly any pet breeder would be able to meet these new standards!”  

 Rep. Renegar noted that the intent of the Commercial Pet Breeders Act was to address the mass breeding operations in which animals were raised in deplorable conditions. He supported requiring that these establishments provide their animals with basic necessities such as adequate cleanliness, shelter, food and fresh water. However, he states that the new rules adopted by the Board are severe and, if applied to other realms such as animal hospitals, very few could even come into compliance.  One example he points to is the rule that states that the stacking of dog enclosures is prohibited. He argues that if a barrier is between the enclosures and it prevents leakage of any waste or other substance from passing through, and the enclosures can be cleaned and sanitized, then they should be allowed. Another example of excessive regulations Rep. Renegar noted is the requirement that commercial pet breeders employ one full-time staff person for each 25 adult pets located at a facility.  “I have a client who has around 50 dogs, and he does an adequate job himself of cleaning his facility twice a day. Requiring him to hire another person to assist him is economically burdensome and unnecessary.” “I also have grave concerns about the rule that requires ‘adequate rest between breeding cycles’. I am a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience, and I don’t think highly of a Board or government bureaucracy that tries to tell a producer how many times and when they can breed an animal. I think this is a very dangerous precedent to set.” “The rules that are currently in place penalize our good breeders, and if left unchecked will force them out of business. I don’t believe this was the intent of the Commercial Pet Breeders Act, but the Board has adopted rules that are excessive, and they cannot stand. If a large portion of these rules are not modified or removed entirely, I will lead the fight to have the Legislature disapprove these rules, which unfortunately would discard the good regulations as well.”